012 Giving Millennials friendly feedback for daily decisions

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Einstein was the Pitch Master!

Einstein said, “If you cannot explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.” What an amazing application for anyone pitching anything. Brevity is king, and when it comes to the elevator pitch, the shorter the better. Think about it: the purpose of the elevator pitch is to quickly answer the question, “So, what do you do?” The last thing you want is for the next question to be, “OK! How do I get away?!?”

It takes practice to go from a lengthy, but clear, explanation to a concise explanation that’s just as clear, if not clearer. That’s why Pitch Practice exists: to take your pitch, and make it better, regardless of what stage you’re in.

What’s in a Name?

Sometimes, everything. Our pitch today is easy to say, but it’s spelled differently than the term “tally”, as spelled according to Webster’s. Knowing that might help the audience if they are intrigued by the service and want to sign up to get the beta announcement.

Who are you talking to?

When you are talking to your target user/customer audience, describing the problem should be far easier than describing the problem to anyone else. Why? Because your target audience is (or should be) the ones experiencing the problem you are solving. Use their language, the words they use to describe the problem.

What do you need?

You should always ask forĀ something in your pitch, but, contrary to popular belief, that “something” is not always money. Asking for honest feedback, especially early on in the life of your startup, is very smart. That’s what our entrepreneur for today’s episode, Robert, very clearly asks for.

Tell us a Story!

Possibly the most compelling way to deliver a great pitch is to tell a story. More specifically, tell a story about how you had that “Flash of Genius” and came up with the idea to solve this problem. When you tell that story, everyone who has ever experienced the same problem can immediately relate, and you’ve crossed into the great territory of empathy, which will win the hearts of your audience.

Feature Your Pitch!

If you want to have your pitch featured on the Pitch Practice Podcast, send it to us by going to pitchpractice.co/mypitch. If you are in Atlanta on a Friday, come join us at Pitch Practice at 1pm at Atlanta Tech Village.

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