Social Media Changed Small Business Marketing Forever

I remember when I started my first business back in 1999. We had a website, the phone, and email. That was it, and we were really happy with that. When we started out, our first mission was to tell everyone we knew what we were up to, so, we sent everyone an email. It was that easy. If someone didn’t respond, well, that’s ok. The only thing required was a solid internet connection. You’ll take note that the term “WiFi” was not present in 1999.

Five or so years later, this thing called “social media” began encroaching on our daily lives. At first, I didn’t pay any attention to it, because it didn’t have anything to do with my business. In fact, after having a glance at the first Twitter UI, I actively rejected it because it was so confusing. Then I started seeing our partners, competitors, and peers add links to their social profiles on their websites and in their email signatures.

I posted my first tweet in 2009. The rest is history. We had realized a few years earlier that we were not a training and certification company, but a content company. This new social media thing turned out to be a fantastic method of distributing content, and when it was good content, our followers shared it. When it wasn’t good, they let us know.

Today, any small business will struggle to attract new customers if the business does not have at least a minimal social presence, and, by that, I don’t mean that you’re “on Facebook” or “on Twitter.” You have to be active. Social media, like it or not, is now a required piece of any business’ marketing mix.

That’s a big step up from having “internet access” in your small business. Fast, reliable internet via rock solid WiFi is a requirement, not only for you, but for your customers, because you and your customers are both on social media all the time. If you want to reach new audiences and increase sales, finding the right mix and right social media channels is paramount.

Keeping up with the ever-evolving world of social media can be tough for a small business owner, but having reliable and fast Internet is not.

 

 
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What do you think about that?