The problem with tech startup ideas is that most of them never make it to the MVP stage. How many game changing ideas have come and gone without a single user? As the saying goes, ideas are a dime a dozen. It’s execution that counts. The issue is that founders who don’t write code really struggle to bring technology to market. So what should non-technical founders do? Should everyone learn how to code? No. Those of us who don’t write code should stay in lane, do what we do best, and figure out how to get our idea to market.

Who is the entrepreneur?

Mariana Velozo works for AppZoro. She’s not the founder, nor is she one of the developers. This pitch is a sales pitch. Yes, Pitch Practice is a great venue for future sales pros to practice, rather than on the phone or in person with actual prospects.

Note that she’s wearing the shirt, says only her first name, and takes the time to write “AppZoro” (with the “Z”!) on the white board. In previous practices at Pitch Practice, Mariana struggled to say the words “App Zoro” so that everyone in the room could hear her with her accent. She got creative to overcome that issue by practicing.

What is the problem?

Many, many, many non-technical founders and entrepreneurs with great ideas can’t get to market because they can’t write code. Furthermore, they don’t know who to trust with the investment – big or small – to get a software or mobile app solution in the hands of potential users. Would you trust the same company that the 4th largest tech startup hub in the US trusts?

What is the solution?

App Zoro, the dev shop that created the official mobile app of Atlanta Tech Village. How many app dev shops are there? How many in Atlanta? The answer to both is “a lot”. So why should anyone choose App Zoro? Until Mariana called it out that they built THE app for ATV, it was difficult to articulate a differentiator. But calling out your best trophy customer gives you instant credibility in the startup world.

Who is the customer?

“Startups and enterprises” is what Mariana said. However, we highly recommend that you name your target audience based on your listening audience. Pick one. In this room at this time, I’d go with startups with non-technical founders every time.

What is the ask?

Always ask for something, target that ask to your audience, and make your ask tangible. What that means is, “Can the audience actually do it right now?” the answer to Mariana’s ask is “yes”.

Want to see more? Subscribe to the Pitch Practice Youtube Channel or the Pitch Practice Podcast on iTunes.

What do you think about that?

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.